Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Paolo Di Canio - brilliant man, fair man, mad man




Saying the name Paolo Di Canio without thinking of some sort of controversy is difficult. In a career that began at his beloved Lazio and ended at Cisco Roma, the Italian saw glimpses of the very heights of Italian Football while representing Juventus, Napoli and AC Milan. But it was his time on England’s shores that catapulted Di Canio into English Football’s folklore.

His single season at Celtic in Scotland during the 1996/97 season wasn’t as successful as one would expect when making the move to one of the Old Firm’s big two. Di Canio looked for greener pastures by moving down south to Sheffield Wednesday, where he was about to make a big impact on the Premier League. Following his spell with the Owls, he went on to play for West Ham, earning himself legendary status with the Hammers, and then Charlton Athletic. It was particularly during his time at Upton Park that Di Canio became a shining light in the Premier league. Goals, skills, controversy and even fair play endeared him to the claret & blue faithful, as well as commentators and pundits, who all viewed Di Canio as a romantic of the game.

He currently manages League Two side Swindon Town and his never-ending stories are still present. Di Canio will always remembered for being one of the most colorful, eccentric, and mad players to have blessed the Premier League. This post will show some of his most memorable moments during his playing days. Images that will show you his brilliance, his fairness and obviously, his madness; Paolo Di Canio really has always been one of a kind. Football these days could do with a few more characters like him. Many people hate him, but in my eyes, he always made it more fun:

Pushing the ref
                                       

The Fascist salute

                                       


Stopping the game, a true sign of Fair Play
                                        

One of the greatest volleys ever scored
                                        

Di Canio demanding to be substituted:
                                       

Penalty argument with Frank Lampard
                                       


1 comment:

  1. There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.

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